Lorena Ruci, Phd

People with High Emotional Intelligence Have These 5 Things in Common

Emotional intelligence comprises of the ability to accurately perceive, recognize and express emotion, understand and incorporate emotion in the way we think, and importantly, regulate emotion. Because EI is such an important contributor to success, we have broken it down into 5 specific abilities that can be learned, practiced and mastered.

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4 Ways To Stress Less


Stress has become one of those words that people use to indicate feeling overwhelmed, busy and over-worked. Feeling stressed is not fun and most of us feel rushed and stressed on a daily basis. We multitask both at work and at home and tend to spend little time to take care of ourselves and our needs. Stress is normal and everyone experiences it differently. There is such a thing as good stress or eustress, which represents the type of drive that is energizing and motivates us to complete a task. It is important to have eustress in our lives, because it helps us feel challenged and incentivized to test our limits, expand our knowledge and master skills. However, when stress accumulates and becomes too much to bear, our capacity to cope is taxed, tension builds and we feel overwhelmed and helpless. People respond differently to stress, depending on their coping skills. When people’s coping skills are not enough to provide relief, they make poor decisions which adds more stress and a vicious cycle begins.

If you find yourself experiencing/doing any of the following, your coping skills can be improved:

  • Inability to meet work or school deadlines
  • Feelings of pressure and anxiety
  • Difficulty sleeping
  • Over-eating/ not having healthy eating habits
  • Increase in smoking, alcohol/drug use
  • Increases in illnesses, like colds and flu, which signal a weak immune system

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What Is Emotional Intelligence? Could It Be More Important Than IQ?


Emotions and success:

The brain and its mysteries have fascinated people for millennia. Initially, people thought that the soul originated from the brain whereas others argued that the heart “housed” the soul and the brain only served to cool the blood. Our fascination with the brain has continued and since then, we have discovered that the brain is responsible for creating and overseeing all vital and crucial functions that allow us to perceive the world, think and feel.

The reason for this fascination is the perception that being very smart is seen as the path to success in school, career and interpersonal relationships. Hence, psychologists have been trying to define intelligence and refine their methods of measuring it in order to explore questions like: “Are smart people more successful”? “Is intelligence related to happiness”? “What makes a person intelligent”? These questions have led to the recognition that while math ability and verbal fluency are important, they are not enough to ensure one will be successful in life.

We have found the missing piece of that puzzle and that piece is called Emotional Intelligence (EI). In simpler words, while IQ is predictive of school smarts, EI is predictive of street smarts. Emotional intelligence is responsible for 58 % of job performance in a variety of occupational settings1. Moreover, 90 % of people who are described as “top performers” in their jobs score high in EI and also, EI translates to financial success as well, with high EI people making an average of $ 29,000/year more than people with low EI2.

Emotional intelligence comprises of the ability to accurately perceive, recognize and express emotion, understand and incorporate emotion in the way we think, and importantly, regulate emotion. Because EI is such an important contributor to success, we have broken it down into 5 specific abilities that can be learned, practiced and mastered.

Read More »